Chapter 10 Bonus: Looking at the Write Space

 

In this video, we have a look at the writing space enjoyed by journalist Rupert Widdicombe, a garden shed that he’s outfitted to give him a place to concentrate, away from the hurly-burly of family life (he and his wife have three children). Then therapist Alice Mallorie gives some ideas for how to create a supportive writing space, and Philip Harland reveals how the need for a good writing space impacts his holidays.

Six Good Ideas about Creating a Writing Space

1. Make sure you have a space with adequate light—ideally, daylight if you’re working during the day. Consider using special light bulbs that mimic daylight (available in many artists’ supply stores).

2. Invest in an ergonomically-correct chair. This is one item on which it’s not wise to try to save money.

3. Get gel wrist pads for your keyboard and maintain good posture to avoid repetitive strain syndrome.

4. If possible, position yourself so that when you look away from the keyboard your eyes can focus on a different distance (out the window or at least across the room).

5. Have adequate supplies handy. I always buy at least two of everything (scissors, tape dispensers, etc.) so I can find at least one quickly.

6. If you need or like to work away from home (e.g., coffee shops, the library, etc.) have a portable office kit that you can take with you that includes a small stapler, tape, sticky notes, extra pens, and so forth).

 

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“With compassion, wit and the wisdom from a long successful writing career, Jurgen Wolff guides you step by step, on the inner and outer journey to writing success.”

— Robert Cochran, co-creator and Executive Producer, ’24’

“Highly recommended. Your Writing Coach pays as much attention to writers as to what they write and should help seasoned pros as much as it will help beginners.”

— Julian Friedmann, agent and editor, Scriptwriter Magazine.