Chapter 16 Bonus

 

Six Good Ideas about…Guerrilla Warfare for the Writer

1. Dare to be distinctive. To paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, you can’t please all of the people all of the time; if you’re bland nobody will be attracted to what you do. For instance, it may be worth using a pen name if your real name isn’t memorable, or using a nickname of some kind. Do you think Jamie Oliver would have become as famous if he hadn’t had the ‘naked chef’ moniker?

2. If life hands you lemons, make lemonade! One of my early plays got uniformly bad reviews, so I took out an ad that said, “The critics are unanimous about Jurgen Wolff’s new play!” and listed the publications involved. If the readers assumed I meant unanimously positive, that was up to them…

3. Offer value in exchange for publicity about your products or services (listen to the audio track to the right for an example you can adapt).

4. Hang out with people who can help you (and who you can help). For writers, this means hanging out with editors, publishers, directors, actors, as well as other writers.

5. Make it visual. If you’re promoting a new product or service, let the press have some interesting photos to go with your press release or proposed article. For instance, I’m using the photo that you saw on the home page, with me and the little gremlin on my shoulder, rather than a standard head shot.

6. Don’t be stingy with words of praise, the thing we all crave the most is to be considered special. If you can honestly see what makes others special and let them know it, you’ll find surprisingly good fortune follows you.

 

[audio:http://yourwritingcoach.com/audio/chap16.mp3]

 

“With compassion, wit and the wisdom from a long successful writing career, Jurgen Wolff guides you step by step, on the inner and outer journey to writing success.”

— Robert Cochran, co-creator and Executive Producer, ’24’

“Highly recommended. Your Writing Coach pays as much attention to writers as to what they write and should help seasoned pros as much as it will help beginners.”

— Julian Friedmann, agent and editor, Scriptwriter Magazine.