Chapter 8 Bonus: Interview with Alice Mallorie

 

Alice Mallorie provides coaching for individuals, teams and team members. She is a Master Practitioner and Certified Trainer of NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming). She also uses her training in the Inner Game of Work (Timothy Gallwey) to help her clients realise their full professional and personal potential. She also brings to the process her own background in the theatre as a designer and director, having studied at Edinburgh University (MA Fine Art) and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.

Additionally she runs workshops and trainings focusing on creativity, innovation, and individual work with the NLP Phobia and Allergy techniques. You can contact Alice Mallorie via email at mallorie@mallorie.fs.net.co.uk. Also see the website of Alice and Roddy Maude-Roxby’s training company, www.presenceinperformance.co.uk.

Six Good Ideas about…Watching Your Language

1. Use language that appeals to all the senses: sight, sound, vision, smell, taste, touch.

2. When writing dialogue, most of the time stick to “he said” and “she said” instead of terms like, “he replied,” “she emphasized,” “he provoked.” And when it’s obvious who is speaking, you don’t even need the “he said” and “she said.”

3. The best style generally is one that doesn’t call attention to itself. Use plain language and avoid using two or three words when one will do.

4. Beware of using too many adjectives and adverbs.

5. When you’ve done your first draft, go through it and weed out any clichés.

6. Reading your first draft out loud often exposes awkward phrases or convoluted sentences. The odds are, if it sounds smooth it will read that way, too.

 

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